Kelsie Ferguson almost misses the point to being prepared in her article DOOMsday Prepping: The theories that keep us ready.  It has nothing to do with the Mayan calendar, rogue asteroids or shifting poles. Sure, these are dramatic events, which draw media attention since they make good movies and news stories. It is more entertaining to see a story involving people with bunkers and gas masks than it is to read about the family who used their emergency supplies to help cut costs and keep eating for a month or two until Mom could find a new job.

The author saves herself in the end of the article with the comment “Whether you’re a believer of a doomsday theory, or simply aware that the world might not always be perfect, it’s hard to find a drawback to having a backup plan. There are different levels and styles of preparing.” Now we are getting some where. Maybe the next article will cover the realistic side of preparedness, where people make common sense decisions to be ready for the likely scenarios that actually will happen.